Monday, December 5, 2016

Primary school student in Borneao wins mini robotics competition

Robotics competition increases student interest in STEAM





WINDHAM - Roughly a dozen people gathered around the plexiglass stadium to watch the fight, with more sitting in the bleachers.

All were eager to see who would be the reigning champion of the Vex Robotics Competition Holiday Classic at Pembroke Academy on Saturday.

The daylong event brought in primarily high school students from all across New England to compete for the chance to advance to next the round before going to the state competition in February. Some who have already qualified still came out to compete.

Educators say competitions like this are vital in efforts to increase student interest in science, technology, engineering, arts and math (STEAM) fields.
- See more at: http://www.unionleader.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20161204/NEWS19/161209771&source=RSS#sthash.ZUhYioXY.dpuf

Robotics competition increases student interest in STEAM





WINDHAM - Roughly a dozen people gathered around the plexiglass stadium to watch the fight, with more sitting in the bleachers.

All were eager to see who would be the reigning champion of the Vex Robotics Competition Holiday Classic at Pembroke Academy on Saturday.

The daylong event brought in primarily high school students from all across New England to compete for the chance to advance to next the round before going to the state competition in February. Some who have already qualified still came out to compete.

Educators say competitions like this are vital in efforts to increase student interest in science, technology, engineering, arts and math (STEAM) fields.
- See more at: http://www.unionleader.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20161204/NEWS19/161209771&source=RSS#sthash.ZUhYioXY.dpuf

Robotics competition increases student interest in STEAM






WINDHAM - Roughly a dozen people gathered around the plexiglass stadium to watch the fight, with more sitting in the bleachers.

All were eager to see who would be the reigning champion of the Vex Robotics Competition Holiday Classic at Pembroke Academy on Saturday.

The daylong event brought in primarily high school students from all across New England to compete for the chance to advance to next the round before going to the state competition in February. Some who have already qualified still came out to compete.

Educators say competitions like this are vital in efforts to increase student interest in science, technology, engineering, arts and math (STEAM) fields.
- See more at: http://www.unionleader.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20161204/NEWS19/161209771&source=RSS#sthash.ZUhYioXY.dpuf

Robotics competition increases student interest in STEAM




WINDHAM - Roughly a dozen people gathered around the plexiglass stadium to watch the fight, with more sitting in the bleachers.

All were eager to see who would be the reigning champion of the Vex Robotics Competition Holiday Classic at Pembroke Academy on Saturday.

The daylong event brought in primarily high school students from all across New England to compete for the chance to advance to next the round before going to the state competition in February. Some who have already qualified still came out to compete.

Educators say competitions like this are vital in efforts to increase student interest in science, technology, engineering, arts and math (STEAM) fields.
- See more at: http://www.unionleader.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20161204/NEWS19/161209771&source=RSS#sthash.ZUhYioXY.dpuf

"Primary school student wins mini robotics competition

Fourteen kids aged six to 15 participated in the Datuk Sebastian Ting Challenge Cup Mini Robotics Competition held in conjunction with 12th Miri Trade Fair (Mitraf 12) here on Sunday.



Primary school pupil Jaxon Moh emerged as the champion, while Yong Vin Cent placed second. Bong Zhen Yong came in third and six-year-old Sim Zhi Yang in fourth place.


Piasau assemblyman Datuk Sebastian Ting presented prizes to the winners.


Earlier when declaring the competition open, Ting also emphasised on the important role of parents in a child’s development and how much each child should value the experiences they go through when they are still young.


“Parents must find time to spend with their children no matter how busy they are so that the children do not feel left out. Every parent wants the best for their children and nurturing their kids from young is vital in the child’s development,” he said.


Praising the event organiser’s efforts, Ting hoped to see this event held again and able to attract more young innovators from around Miri.


“Going through a competition like this is a very valuable experience for these kids. Their young minds are very curious and willing to learn new things and I urge every parent to encourage their children and support their talent,” he said, adding he was proud to see the involvement of these young participants.
Ting also said parents should expose their kids to encourage them to be more creative and innovative as these are the ones that would be the country’s future innovators.

Participants in this competition made their own mini robots using Lego Mindstorms within a stipulated time. The judging was based on which was the stronger mini robot that could pull their opponent’s robot to the other side.


The challenge cup, which was being held at Mitraf for the first time, was organised by Quick Smart Tutoring Centre and Robowis, co-organised by See Hua Marketing (SHM) and sponsored by Sasbadi..."

Read the full story at its source: Borneo Post Online -  http://www.unionleader.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20161204/NEWS19/161209771&source=RSS

Monday, November 28, 2016

LEGO Robots Win at World Robot Olympiad in India


"2 Taiwanese Teenagers Win World Robot Olympiad in India

W DELHI (AP) — Whizzing around a green felt table chasing a soccer ball beaming infrared light, the boxy robot shoots—and scores—and wins its Taiwanese teenage creators first prize at this year's student robot games.

The two breadbox-sized scooters, playing goalie and kicker, from the team called "Wings of Storm" were up against another Taiwanese team's robots in the "Football" category of the World Robot Olympiad held over the weekend in the Indian capital of New Delhi.

"We have been practicing since primary school," said Liaw Jia-wun, 15, thrilled to have won with his teammate. "We never in our lives could think that we would win the world championship."
Other categories at the robotics championships—attended by more than 450 teams from 50 countries—asked participants to create robotics solutions to reduce or recycle waste, leading teams to build robots that emptied trash bins or scooped up building debris for future use.

Some participants were as young as 6 years old, while others were approaching university graduation.
In the more advanced robotics category, robots had to be preprogrammed for the automated challenge of picking up mini bowling balls and knocking down pins. That meant the robots had to sense where the target was and hit it without any intervention from their creators.

The idea is to teach students computer programming as robotics moves beyond factory applications to everyday functions, said engineer Dominic Bruneau, the head coach for the Canadian teams.
"More and more, we will be interacting with robots" in our daily lives, Bruneau said. The student engineers are not just working on theory but are "doing practical work of building real stuff and trying to solve problems."

South African teacher and coach Nicky Du Plessis said the games helped kids develop key skills.
"We start with the fundamentals. We believe that if kids can start from a very young age ... it teaches them how to build," she said. "Then it teaches them logical thinking. How to change something quickly."

Read the full article at its source: 
http://www.popularmechanics.com/technology/robots/a24039/world-robot-olympiad/

Click on book cover for information

Click on book cover for information
Getting Started with LEGO Robotics. Anyone who works with kids can do LEGO Robotics, a rich and highly motivating platform for important STEM Learning! (surprisingly affordable, too) This books explains it all!

Sunday, November 27, 2016

CoderZ: An Appealing Student Robotics Approach

Looks like a powerful program... I find the Virtual AND/OR Real World Robots aspect to be appealing... I expect to investigate this one further and hope to provide an in-depth review here!

Mark





gocoderz.com + http://gocoderz.com/free-trial/

Monday, November 21, 2016

Former Ugandan Child Soldiers NOW High School Student Robotics Team Members

"Shoreline high school students mentor team from Uganda in robot building challenge"

 

SHORELINE, Wash. - It's a partnership born out of a shared love of robotics, but the students working together at King's High School in Shoreline couldn't have come from more different backgrounds.
All this week, five students from Beacon of Hope, a secondary school in Soroti, Uganda have been laboring with their mentors, the members of the King's High School CyberKnights robotics team, to build a robot for the First Tech Challenge competition.

It's a monumental step forward for the team from Uganda, whose members were once child soldiers, kidnapped from their families and forced to commit atrocities by Lord’s Resistance Army, the rebels fighting government forces in the country’s bloody civil war.

"The only thing I could see was death and at any time they could kill us," said Denish Odele, now 24, who was forced to learn to handle an AK-47 and had to survive by shooting people he knew.
He showed a scar the length of his forearm where a rebel commander cut it open with a bayonet after Denish didn't follow his order to find banana leaves for dinner.

For 40,000 children caught in the Ugandan civil war, hope was fleeting and survival was dim.
"We would not have any big dream," said Denish.


But then came a remarkable turnaround.


Denish was captured by government forces and beaten but survived. He made it to Beacon of Hope, run by Seattle based non-profit Pilgrim Africa. The intent of the school is to provide an educational opportunity for children caught in the civil war, many who survived without their parents..."
Read the full article at its source: http://komonews.com/news/local/shoreline-high-school-stude nts-mentor-team-from-uganda-in-robot-building-challenge 

Saturday, November 19, 2016

Robot Bees to Pollinate Crops?

A frightening response to what may turn out to be human-created decline of nature... humans applying technology to solve problems... GREAT! BUT, what follows? That they tell themselves they don't have to worry about being destructive any longer because their technology will solve it all? (reminds me of the mess we create with antibiotics)... is this a slippery slope to accelerated self destruction. 




"Tiny Flying Robots Are Being Built To Pollinate Crops Instead Of Real Bees

Honeybees, which pollinate nearly  one-third of the food we eat , have been dying at unprecedented rates because of a mysterious phenomenon known as  colony collapse disorder  (CCD). The situation is so dire that in late June the White House gave a  new task force  just 180 days to devise a coping strategy to protect bees and other pollinators. The crisis is generally attributed to a mixture of disease, parasites, and pesticides.  
Other scientists are pursuing a different tack: replacing bees. While there's no perfect solution,  modern technology offers hope.

Last year, Harvard University researchers led by engineering professor Robert Wood introduced the first RoboBees, bee-size robots with the ability to lift off the ground and hover midair when tethered to a power supply. The details were published in the journal Science. A coauthor of that report, Harvard graduate student and mechanical engineer Kevin Ma, tells Business Insider that the team is "on the eve of the next big development." Says Ma: "The robot can now carry more weight The project represents a breakthrough in the field of micro-aerial vehicles. It had previously been impossible to pack all the things needed to make a robot fly onto such a small structure and keep it lightweight.

Superthin robot wings flap 120 times a second. Harvard University

A Bee-Placement?
The researchers believe that as soon as 10 years from now these RoboBees could artificially pollinate a field of crops, a critical development if the commercial pollination industry cannot recover from severe yearly losses over the past decade.."

Read the full article at its source:  http://www.businessinsider.com/harvard-robobees-closer-to-pollinating-crops-2014-6

Robot Arm with LEGO Robotics Materials

 Another good piece on Making, Designing, Programming, and Understanding LEGO Robots from Mr. Hino...